Color White Rat Walther. Odd-Eye White

Odd-Eye - the variants of the rat

Kathrin Guttmann Body, Knowledge, Breeding & Genetic

The American Fancy Rat Society recognizes Odd-Eye on all colors and drawings. The first official description of an Odd-Eye-rat lovers and hobby breeders area was at 24.01.1983 by Karen Hauser Cal Poly Pomona, THAT, USA made, after these animals are already 1972 described in laboratory stocks (Gumbreck et al.1)Laurence G. Gumbreck Allan J. Stanley John E. Allison Ronald B. Easley (1972), Restriction of color in the rat with associated sterility in the male and heterochromia in both sexes, Journal of Experimental Zoology, Volume180, Issue3, 333-3492)RANDOLPH M. MACY ALLAN J. STANLEY LAURENCE G. GUMBRECK (1972), Genetic Factors Involved in Heterochromia in the Norway Rat, Journal of Heredity, Volume 63, Issue 4, 189–190). Odd-Eye (Odd is English for odd, strange) is a phenotype, in the eyes of the rat in question have different colors. One eye is usually black or dark ruby (dark ruby), while the other eye ruby ​​or pink. These Different colors of the irises of the eyes by disturbing the pigmentation is also called Iris heterochromia. Affected are mainly white or piebald animals with partial or complete leucism. In rats, it is mainly Capped or Masked animals blazes, show the Heterochromie. Often there are animals with Red Eye Dilute (Red-eyed dilution) such as Topaz or Beige, but also in animals without this dilution Heterochromie been reported.

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The genetics of Odd-Eye rat

the genetics, which causes the iris heterochromia in pet rats, remains largely unclear. It can be assumed, that there are even more loci and alleles, give rise to odd-Eye rats.

Die Restricted-Hypothese

an allele, which can trigger an Odd-eye phenotype, is probably the Restricted allele H(re), that lies on the hooded H locus and is dominant over all other alleles at the locus H. More to the inheritance of the hooded alleles found in Article "Genetic analysis of the modifier for the Hooded phenotype in rats". The Restricted allele was 1072 for the first time by Stanley and Gumbreck3)Laurence G. Gumbreck Allan J. Stanley John E. Allison Ronald B. Easley (1972), Restriction of color in the rat with associated sterility in the male and heterochromia in both sexes, Journal of Experimental Zoology, Volume180, Issue3, 333-3494)RANDOLPH M. MACY ALLAN J. STANLEY LAURENCE G. GUMBRECK (1972), Genetic Factors Involved in Heterochromia in the Norway Rat, Journal of Heredity, Volume 63, Issue 4, 189–190 described. The allele causes a strong dominant limitation color portions in the drawing, a dominant whole or in part, infertility in males and lethality in homozygous embryos. There are also indications, that can be born under circumstances homozygous pups, but those within the first 35 die daily as a result of megacolon. Therefore, two Restricted animals should never be bred together.

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The Recessive allele hypothesis

but the Restricted allele is probably not the only possible cause of Odd-Eyes. So discusses the American Fancy Rat an Mouse Association a recessive allele as a basis. Sure but seems to be, Odd-Eye that in connection with pronounced drawings, especially blazes is. A high proportion of white seems to increase the likelihood, that heterochromia occurs. However, obviously a random factor plays a big role in the inheritance of Odd-Eye, since even the mating of Odd-Eye parents unsure leads to odd-eye descendants, as would be with a recessive allele.

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The role of chance

There it seems likely, that the shape of Uniformity and their location affects the pigmentation, and these is random, at least a part. Often, it is namely so, that the lighter eye is on a white background, or at least very close to it. For this reason, it is also extremely difficult to impossible, specifically to breed safely Odd-Eye Animals. Independently of, What genetic background is assumed, are less Odd-Eye Animals, as one would expect.

References   [ + ]

1, 3. Laurence G. Gumbreck Allan J. Stanley John E. Allison Ronald B. Easley (1972), Restriction of color in the rat with associated sterility in the male and heterochromia in both sexes, Journal of Experimental Zoology, Volume180, Issue3, 333-349
2, 4. RANDOLPH M. MACY ALLAN J. STANLEY LAURENCE G. GUMBRECK (1972), Genetic Factors Involved in Heterochromia in the Norway Rat, Journal of Heredity, Volume 63, Issue 4, 189–190